Before You Sit – Hardware Check That Patio Chair

Patio chairs are something we take for granted until they don’t do what we want them to. Unfortunately when we find out there is a problem with a patio chair is often after we have taken a seat for it to collapse on us. At the least this can be quite an embarrassing thing to happen in front of other people. At the most, you could get hurt in the process. Even worse, someone else could sit in the chair and be injured at your home. Not only would you feel awful, but this could also open you up to a lawsuit. Instead, it is better that you make sure the patio chairs in your yard are in good shape and ready to do their job.

Many people wonder how it is that a piece of furniture can suddenly become weak or wobbly. The last time you used it, it was just fine. What has changed between then and now? Often the change is the fact that winter went by. Winter can be a very tough time for furniture, even though you are not using it.

Here’s what happens. Over the course of a winter the temperature outside can fluctuate above and below freezing day in and day out. This not only is something that you have to bundle up against, but also something that impacts your hardware. You see, the furniture pieces you have may contrast and expand again with those freezing and warming trends. The hardware that is attached to the furniture may not move with it. Often this can have an ‘unscrewing effect’, turning the screw or bolt just a fraction of a turn each time it happens.

If this were just to happen once or twice you likely would not notice. But, this can happen a few times in a day and hundreds of time over the course of the winter. By the time the weather starts to warm up, many of your hardware pieces can be completely loose or even out of the furniture altogether.

If you do not take action to tighten and secure these pieces before you sit down, even more damage can be done. Not only will you risk hurting yourself or someone else but there is the impact on the furniture as well. If a screw or bolt is only partially in, and you sit on it, it will likely fail. This will cause the chair to collapse and usually the bolt or screw will rip into the surface of the furniture as it tries to hold together. Now instead of just being able to tighten pieces you have a repair job on your hand, assuming it is fixable.

Once you think about going back out to your patio chair after winter make sure to take a toolbox with you. Before you take a seat, take a few minutes to go around all of the pieces of hardware on the patio chair and tighten them up to make sure they are as sturdy as they should be and ready to do their job.

Furniture Care and Preservation

Weather Changes

Wood is very sensitive to water and changes in relative humidity. As the weather changes from season to season, so does the humidity in your home and also the moisture content of your wood furniture. This situation causes the wood to expand and contract with every change in the humidity. The purpose of the finish is to minimize the effects of moisture changes by sealing the wood. Wood likes moderate conditions of around 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit with a relative humidity of around 45 percent to 55 percent. Most homes today have air handling systems that provide a humidifier in winter to add moisture when the air is “dry” and an air conditioner in summer to remove moisture when the air is “wet”. If you do not have this optimum condition but keep the temperature and humidity steady, even if they are to high or to low, it is much better than frequent and/or sudden changes. Furniture can deteriorate quickly if stored in a basement (high moisture), attic (high heat), garage or non -climate controlled storage units or warehouses (continual changing conditions). Excess heat and dryness can cause wood to split and/or crack. Keep your furniture away from all direct heat sources like radiators, wood stoves and air ducts. If you need to put your furniture near a heat source, use a shield or diverter to deflect or direct heat away. Wood is most likely to check (crack) when the climate in your home suddenly changes from hot and humid to cold and dry. Frequent and sudden changes in humidity and temperature are especially bad.

Here are a few suggestions for dealing with humidity:

Furniture can best handle temperature and humidity changes when they occur gradually. Sudden changes like opening a vacation home, or putting items into non-climate controlled storage in winter directly from your warm home can be problems for your furniture.
When air conditioning your home, it is best to keep the intake of outside humid air to a minimum. Don’t open the windows to “air out” the house on fair days.
Add a humidifier or vaporizing unit to your heating system to help stabilize the humidity level during the cold dry months of winter.
Use dehumidifiers in damp rooms and during prolonged rainy seasons to remove excess moisture from the air.

Sunlight

The ultraviolet light rays from the sun will damage finishes and bleach the stain and wood underneath. Prolonged exposure to sunlight can cause the finish to crack, sometimes in a pattern resembling the looks like cracked glass. Try to keep furniture out of direct sunlight. When that’s not possible, reduce the amount of light streaming on any piece of furniture. Use window shades, drapes or blinds to block direct sun light during the time of day the furniture is exposed. The use of UV screening films will dramatically reduce long term bleaching effect and are well worth the investment. Uniformly expose surfaces to light. Avoid letting the sun hit only part of a surface. Occasionally move lamps, doilies and other objects so the wood bleaches uniformly. Cover furniture with sheets or blankets if you leave your home for several months at a time. Move your furniture around periodically so that the same piece is not exposed to light all the time. However, some bleaching can be desirable. Antique collectors actually look for the rich, soft tones that fading can bring, particularly on Walnut and Rose Wood.

Cleaning

Carefully choose wood care products. There is a lot of confusion about what wood-care products to use. Store shelves are stacked with countless brands of wax, polish, spray and oil. Clever marketing techniques, tell us to use there product because it “feeds” the wood while it cleans and protects it too. Unless your furniture is unfinished, or the finish has deteriorated and worn off, when you clean your furniture you’re actually cleaning the finish, not the wood. There is absolutely no way for any cleaning product to “feed” or “nourish” the wood because the wood is sealed and protected by the finish. Proper care will prolong the life of a finish. Waxing the finish makes the surface of furniture slippery so that objects slide along it without scratching and dust will not stick. The wax protects the finish and the finish protects the wood. To clean, simply wipe with a soft lent free, damp (not wet) cloth. Be careful using water to clean wood. Water is wood’s worst enemy. Wood should never get wet or soaked. Water can cause swelling, warping or satins if it penetrates a finish. Most finishes are water resistant, not water proof. Use coasters, pads, cloths or runners to protect against spills and water rings. Consulting a professional before cleaning valuable antiques and heirlooms.

Dusting

What’s the best way to care for my furniture? Ask five different people, and you’ll get five different answers. But most “experts” agree on a some basics. First of all, remember your mother is always right: Dust frequently. Keep away from feather dusters. They just move dust around, flinging it into the air, moving from one item to the next. Broken quills have sharp edges and could scratch the finish. Some types of dust are abrasive so infrequent dusting can create worn and dull surfaces over the years. Dust can accumulate in carvings, cracks and grooves and look an unattractive “gray”. This dusty buildup eventually becomes hard to remove. This “gray” look is often imitated by finishers using wax mixed with pumice or rotten stone powders to make an item look aged (Aren’t we clever!).

Use a clean, washable cloth made of soft, lint-free cotton. My favorites are cotton diapers, old T-shirt, or any soft cotton fabric. When using old clothing be sure to remove all hooks, snaps, buttons and zippers that could scratch surfaces. Don’t use a rag that has loose threads or unraveling edges. These can catch on wood splinters, moldings or loose veneer and pull them off.

Dusting with a dry cloth is abrasive and will ultimately dull the finish. A dry cloth will not really remove much dust. Sprinkling a few drops of water onto the dusting cloth. The trick is to moisten the cloth just enough to make dust adhere to it. The cloth should not be so damp that it wets the finish (leaving water streaks). If you can see any trace of water on the wood after you wipe, your cloth is to wet. Do not use any spray-on dusting aids or polish. Most of them contain water with an emulsifier to suspend some kind oil, or contain silicones. This type of oil is used in most commercial furniture sprays and polishes.

Wipe off dust using gentle, oval motions along the grain of the wood. Turn or fold the cloth often so you don’t just move dust and dirt from one spot to another. Lift, don’t slide, lamps and objects to dust under them.

Scratch Prevention

Lift, don’t slide, objects on finished surfaces. Place objects on trivets, tablecloths, doilies or others covers to protect the finish. Use felt bottoms on lamps and other decorative objects. Especially ceramic objects as they are very abrasive. Avoid bright red felt because its color could leach into the wood through the finish. Use water based wood glue to stick the felt on objects. Some Chemicals in self stick adhesives used on felt can cause a reaction that softens or melts the finish. Use place mats or a table cloth to protect the finish from plates and silverware.

Chemical Exposure

Keep solvents products like nail polish remover, alcohol and paint thinner away from furniture because they can harm the finish. Alcohol is in colognes, perfumes, medications as well as in wine, beer and liquor. Your perspiration and body oils can also harm a finish over time. Plants and flower nectar or pollen that touch the finish can also cause permanent stains. Over watering a plant can cause permanent stains when the fertilizers that dissolved into the water soaks through the finish to the wood. Placing hot items on furniture can cause a chemical change in the finish that results in white rings or spots.

Do not leave plastic objects lying on finished surfaces. Color from plastic tablecloths, appliance covers, food wrappers, plastic place mats and toys can discolor the finish and leach into wood over time. There can be a chemical reaction between some types of finish and cretin plastics that causes them to stick to each other, damaging the finish when it is pulled off. I once repaired an armoire after the customer placed a pair of leather-like gloves on the shelf in the spring and could not remove them next fall.

Moving

Lift, don’t slide heavy furniture especially on carpets. After a short time heavy items will flatten the carpet and padding under the legs or base. Pulling or sliding an item with some of its legs in these “craters” will often brake them. Sliding pieces on wood floor can damage the floors. Furniture legs may or may not have protective glides on them. The glides are used at the factory to make it easy to slide items without damaging the legs on hard surfaces. They are there primarily to aid in the manufacturing process not to protect your floor.

Brass Polishing

First, is it truly brass? A lot of modern hardware is a brass plating over a steel base. Take a small magnet off the refrigerator and see if it will stick to the brass. If it does, its plated and not solid brass. Heavy polishing of a plated item often will remove the plating reveling the steel base. Use caution and very light polishing for this type of hardware.

Some brass, solid and plated, was designed to have a dark, “antique” look. A chemical solution was applied to the brass to make it turn color. This is most often seen on the lesser expensive plated hardware.

Most solid and plated brass hardware on furniture today has a protective, tarnish resistant coating. It probably will not tarnish for a very long time and will only need to be dusted. If the brass is tarnishing and you want to polish it, first remove the brass so that the brass cleaner will not damage the finish. If your brass cleaner/polish does not seam to work, it may be that there is a protective finish covering the brass that must be removed first. After polishing it is best to apply a new tarnish resistant coating. Brass will tarnish quickly when exposed to air.

Wax Build-up

Wax build-up from past waxing is not often seen today. Because most people have been sold on the “benefits” and convince of spray polishes or oil. Very few people in North America use real wax today.

Wax build-up occurs over a long period of time. Its usually only seen in the crevices and corners where it can not be wiped off or when to much wax is used and then accumulates. The same areas where dust accumulates also. The built up mixture of dust and wax presents no real potential danger or damage to the furniture. It is a problem of aesthetics only. Some people however, prefer the patina of this aged look.

Removing old wax is done with solvents that dissolve the wax and then are wiped off with a clean cloth. The procedure is often performed several time to achieve a complete cleaning before a new coat of wax is applied. This procedure is best left to professionals who work in well ventilated work areas.
Also read: Wax, Polish, Oil: Which Is Best?

Drawers

It is important to check your furniture’s drawer system for ware and damage every few years or when they stick or are hard to open. Pull out each drawer and examine the runners, slides, stops and guides. Not all drawer systems have all those components. Some will have metal drawer slides others have wood runners and some just slide on the frame of the cabinet. On metal parts use a small amount of light grease or petroleum jelly to lubricate friction points and bearings. On wood to wood parts use a candle or block of paraffin wax to lubricate all surfaces where wood rubs on wood. Some drawer systems have a center wood slide with a plastic or metal guide or just plastic guides at the right and left sides of the drawer opening. For this type wax only the wood that runs against the guides. If a drawer goes into the cabinet to far, then the drawer stops are broken or missing and should be repaired.

Don’t cram extra clothing into a full drawer. The drawer may be designed to carry the weight but the extra stress created by the friction or clothing catching on edges can brake the drawer’s components or chip off veneer. Use some discretion in the amount of weight you put into very large drawers. They may be able to hold a lot of volume but not excess weight. If a properly working and lubricated drawer is hard to open, you most likely have to much weight in it. Drawers that have two handles should be opened using both to prevent damage to runners and guides. Tighten lose, and replace missing screws that secure the hardware. Lose hardware mars the finish and gouges the wood. All lose joints and broken parts should be repaired as soon as possible to prevent additional damages. Drawers that stick in the summer months are swollen due to the extra moisture in the air. This occurs most often to drawers that are unfinished or not sealed on the inside. They should be adjusted to fit properly, then sealed to prevent recurrence. Don’t pry stuck drawers open or slam tight fitting drawers shut, as this often causes severe damage.

Doors

There are two types of doors on furniture. Sliding doors and hinged doors. A sliding door can be glass or wood. It fits into a slot or grove (top and bottom) which is sometimes lined with a plastic molding. These doors require little maintenance. If they do not slide easily they may just need a little lubricating. Most sliding doors, other than tambours, can be removed by lifting the door into the top slot so that it clears the bottom slot then pull the bottom of the door out and the top will follow. Lubricate the slots and door edges that fit into the slots with paste wax or paraffin for doors that have a wood to wood fit. A small amount of petroleum jelly works great for glass doors in a plastic track. Tambours are sliding panels made of small strips of wood with a cloth backing enabling them to bend around corners and slide in tracks that are shaped to fit the contour of the furniture (a roll-top desk is an example). The best way to lubricate these is to slid the panel all the way in, then lubricate the track (slot/grove). To remove a tambour it is necessary to remove at least the back and often other parts. Removing or repairing tambours should generally be done by a professional.

There are a number of things that can cause a hinged door not to fit properly. One of the most common problems is that the cabinet is not level and the top or bottom edges of the doors will bind or rub on the cabinet frame. This is simple to fix. Large wood cabinets are flexible and will conform to the shape of the floor or carpet. To check if leveling is the problem look at the top edges of the doors, if you have two doors the top edges of booth doors should be in a straight line with each other and have an even clearance gap from the frame of the cabinet. An out of level cabinet will have doors edges that slant (both doors in the same direction) showing a narrowing clearance gap from one end of the door to the other. To correct a leveling problem, shim the front leg on the side where the clearance gap is the smallest or the back leg where the clearance gap is the largest. I use a piece of cardboard as a shim, folding it over on itself several times (trial and error method) to achieve the proper thickness that will align the doors properly.

A door that will not stay closed is a nuisance. Here is a check list of things that cause this problem.

The cabinet is leaning forward. Don’t laugh, it happens a lot. When you set a cabinet against the wall in a room with wall to wall carpeting make sure you do not set the back legs on the carpet’s tack strip. This will cause it to lean forward. Also check for adjustable levelers that are over extended on the back legs.
The cabinet is out of level causing the door catches not to align.
The door is “hinge bound”. This occurs when the mortis cuts into the door and/or cabinet frame to mount the hinge is to deep causing the hinged side of the door to hit the cabinet’s frame. The hinges need to be shimmed to correct this problem.
The door is “screw bound”. This is similar to hinge bound in that the door can not close all the way. The screws in the hinges are to large or the wrong kind (round head instead of flat head). The heads of the screw(s) on the door side of the hinge and the ones on the frame side hit each other, not allowing the door to close.
The door catches are broken, missing or worn out.

Loose and missing hinge screws also cause door fit problems. Double doors will hit each other in the center, single door cabinets will rub against the top side of the cabinet frame and both types will rub or drag on the bottom. Often wearing off the finish. To check for loose screws, open a door a short distance and hold it on the top with one hand and the bottom with your other hand. Gently tilt it up and down. If the hinges are loose you will feel the door move and may hear a sound also from the screws hitting the metal hinges.

One more thing. Be careful opening cabinets with large doors. The weight of the door(s) when open can cause the cabinet to fall forward! Newer furniture comes with a warning tag, but older and antique items do not. You can secure the cabinet to the wall or floor with screws or load it with heavy items to counter balance the weight of the doors. I have heard several reports of people being injured when they opened heavy glass doors and the cabinet fell over on them.

Glass and Mirrors

There is not much maintenance required for glass panels or mirrors. Just clean with your favorite glass cleaner as needed. The proper way to clean glass on furniture is to apply the cleaner to the rag, not directly on the glass itself. Spray type glass cleaners contain ammonia and some times alcohol. The over-spray that gets on the wood trim can damage the finish over time.

A few thoughts to consider about re-silvering mirrors and beveled glass. It is much less expensive to replace a mirror than to re-silver it if the edge is not beveled. Beveled edging can be expensive because not many glass shops do that kind of work. They will send it out to a third party and mark-up the price. There are a number of franchise type restoration shops that offer re-silvering in-house and some of them will sub-out the job. The “look” of an old glass that has been properly re-silvered has a beautiful gold colored hue which is very desirable on antique furniture. I have seen several re-silvered mirrors that have deteriorated in a relatively short time. Find out what warranty comes with a re-silvering job before you commit to have the work done. Re-silvering is a good choice if you have an old glass (the “wavy look” of old glass is from the type of processing. The molten glass was pulled from the oven and stretched to a thickness as it cooled. New glass is done much the same way, but goes through sets of steel rollers, thus a very smooth finish and consistent thickness).

If You Want to Win More Customers and Sell at Better Prices, DON’T Just Sell the Hardware

Years ago, if you were to be a foreign brand in China, you will find that you can command a real brand premium over other “Made-In-China” products. The reasons are very simple. You probably have

• Better quality,
• Better performance,
• Better safety,
• Better reputation and trustworthiness etc.

Since most of the products (or hardware) in China cannot match with the above quality, it’s a no-brainer that the foreign brand can command higher prices, AND still sell like hot cakes.

However, things have changed drastically over these few years. Nowadays, wherever you are in the world, you can find “Made-in-China” products that have met:

• International quality standards,
• International performance standards,
• International safety standards, and
• Reasonable levels of reputation and trustworthiness

While some customers are still reeling from product safety such as the 2008 Chinese Milk Scandal, but even world-class manufacturers like Toyota have problems with their Foot Pedals. No matter how you look at it, Chinese products are indeed catching up fast.

Yet, despite rising costs in China, Chinese products are still priced very low. This low pricing has caused many international brands to lose a lot of businesses due to their higher prices. The impact on the Chinese companies isn’t that good either: many Chinese companies are suffering from negative profits, shortage of funds or cash flow issues because of the low prices they quote. As a result, it’s a lose-lose situation for all.

Why Selling the Hardware Will Drive Down Prices

Besides the fact that there are a lot more competing products that are almost as good but selling at half your prices, here are some trends in the market that are driving prices down:

• Ease of getting information. These days if you want to search for just about any product, you can go online and just find it. Even if you cannot download price lists readily, it can be found in ways that are easier than before. Hence, prices are transparent if you are looking at the hardware specs alone.
• The hardware is getting a lot more homogeneous. Whatever product specifications that you offer, chances are the differences between you and your competitor are marginal at best. Since there are not much differences between the hardware, customers make more of their decisions based on price.
• Customers are getting more knowledgeable. Customers are better educated these days to find out what kind of hardware they want, AND what kinds of prices they can get. Sometimes, they even know more than the sales person when it comes to product (or hardware) knowledge.

In a nutshell, if a sales person were to sell the hardware, all it takes is the customer to say “I was quoted a lower price from your competitor” and voila! The price just miraculously dropped to match the competitor’s.

Even then, the astute customer may not just buy from sales people who sell the hardware, and then quote the lowest price for it. Instead, they need better advice before making a buying decision.

The Buyers’ Dilemma

If you were to put yourself in the customers’ shoes, here are some of the customer’s concerns when making a purchase:

• “Since everybody quoted the same specs at similar prices, from whom should I buy from?”;
• “Since everybody quoted the same specs, how do I know who will live up to their promises, and who won’t?”;
• “If I am going to make the purchase, how do I know that it will solve my problems, and work well as planned?”
• “If I am gong to make the purchase, how do I know that I will get assistance and support if things don’t work out as planned?”

While customers may be a lot better informed and educated, the business environment they work in are also getting a lot more complicated. Hence, here are some other factors that they would consider before making the buying decisions:

• “Are there any better ways that I can get a better result?”;
• “Are there ways that I can do more with less?”;
• “Are there any other factors that I’m not aware of?”

Thus, the customer’s experience is not just some fluffy concept that applies exclusively to the service industry. While the customer already knows a fair bit about the hardware specifications, but what they need now is to have a better experience buying the products they need.

Such “experience” actually add value by helping customers get better business results. Astute customers appreciate that. For customers that are still shopping on price for critical purchases, it will be the job of the sales person to educate them on how to get better results through a better customer experience.

Customising the Customer’s Experience

Suppose you are a sales person for Bayer MaterialScience’s Coatings, Adhesives and Specialties Business Unit, and you sell coatings to the buildings industry. The stain-resistant coatings used for homes, offices, restaurants and hospitals may be of similar chemical properties, BUT the customer expectations are different:

• The home owner may want to make sure that the coatings will save their parquet floors from their dog’s poo or their child’s vomit, so that if they have a visitor, the floor can be cleaned easily and be presentable;
• The office manager may want the carpets be coffee stain resistant, so that their offices look presentable to customers who may visit them;
• The restaurant owner would like the extra-strength stain-resistant coatings since their diners may spill wine, food and other contaminants onto the floor every day. The flooring also needs to be slip-proof to prevent the waiters from slipping;
• Hospitals would want to have their floors to be protected from abrasive chemicals and *gasp* blood! They wouldn’t want to frighten patients with blood stains that could not be cleaned.

Sounds easy? Unfortunately, the coatings sales person is unlikely to sell to the home owner, office manager restaurant owner or hospitals. Instead, he or she is very much likely to be selling to parquet, carpets and other flooring manufacturers, who will then sell to the end users.

Chances are, the flooring coatings sales person is not going to ask to whom those parquet, carpets and other flooring manufacturers are selling to. He or she is unlikely to advise which selling points of the coated floorings will appeal to which customer groups.

On the other hand, the coatings sales person who is able to provide better business advice (as opposed to technical advice) for the customer is going to create a much better customer experience. When the customer gets a more productive (and sometimes enjoyable) buying experience, they are likely to buy more from you.

And since you are able to justify the business reason why it makes more sense to buy from you, you are much likelier to get a better price from your customer.

Here are some other examples of some “experiences” that customers want, but find lacking in sales people:

• If you are selling meeting facilities in a hotel, can you find out from the customer what is so important about the meeting, and what will be the service that matters most?;
• If you are selling IT software solutions, can you find out about the end-user’s work habits so that they find the software easy to use and really boost their productivity?;
• If you provide furniture hardware to office furniture manufacturers, can you give suggestions on how they can use your hardware to save space and allocate more seats in office spaces with high rental costs?

Ultimately, the experience customers have with your company starts the moment you make the initial contact with them. If you would like to keep their business, then you would have to keep on selling the “experience” for as long as you can!

by c.j. Ng

c.j. is the trusted sales advisor who have helped international companies achieve quantum improvements in sales profits in China and beyond. He is also the 1st-ever sales trainer and consltant to speak at the American Society for Training & Development (ASTD) International Convention. So far, c.j. has helped:

* A leading international hotel to produce the equivalent of an additional 5,000 room nights in China in the lull summer months of 2007 * A global leading architectural hardware company to increase the sales revenue of a key account in Shanghai by 10 times within 3 weeks * The world leader in PC sales to transform their sales force to be more collaborative and solution-focused, and helping them to regain worldwide pole position from their nearest competitor.

How to Install Recessed Furniture Hardware

So you got all the new recessed hardware for your kitchen cabinets but you do not have a clue how to install them. You need an upgrade in the kitchen but could not afford to buy brand new cabinets. The good news is that installing the hinges and pulls is incredibly easy to do and only takes a few short steps. With these few steps, your new recessed hardware looks as if a contractor came to install them instead of it being a do it yourself project.

Installing new recessed hardware on your cabinets can be a fun and easy way to get new looking cabinets without paying the price for brand new ones. The best part is that learning how to install recessed hardware is not much different than installing any other type of hardware. You just need a few tools to get the job done. The rest is just having someone to help you hold them while you install the new hardware.

1. Tools Needed – In order to do the recessed hardware replacement, you need to have a few tools available. You may also need a friend to help remove the cabinet doors if you cannot lift them on your own. The tools needed are:

Screwdriver
Wrench
Drill
Tape Measure
Sandpaper if Needed

2. Remove Old Hardware – You need to remove the old hardware before installing the new recessed hardware. Using the screwdriver, carefully remove any screws that are holding the pulls or handles on. Starting with the bottom hinge, remove those screws as well. Do the same with the top ones. Keep in mind that the doors are coming off so you need have someone there to help you hold the cabinet door if you cannot do it yourself.

3. Clean Up Doors – If there are any rough edges on the wood they need to be sanded down before installing the new hardware. This makes for a better fit when the new hardware is installed. The new hardware needs to be flush and if there are any high spots on the cabinets they can look bad.

4. Install New Hinges – After cleaning up the doors, you need to install the new hinges. Use the tape measure and make sure the new hinges have the same hole configuration as the ones that were removed. If they do not, use the drill to make new holes for the new hinges. While the doors are still off the cabinets, put the new hinges onto the cabinet doors. Have your helper hold them up to the cabinets and attach the other side of the hinges to the cabinets. Do the top first and then the bottom.

Now you have it. Installation doesn’t have to be difficult, especially when there are now so many great resources available to help you.

Antique Furniture Hardware Product Restoration – Extend The Life Of Your Furniture

Anyone with even the most minimal knowledge of antiques will know that they have to be treasured and well looked after. Being over a hundred years old, they will need regular restoration as well as routine cleaning whatever your use for them. Eventually they will also need antique furniture hardware product restoration to save them from irreparable damage. Think of it as surgery for furniture!

Antique furniture hardware product restoration is a chore simply because it may prove impossible to get hold of the parts needed to actually complete the process. Doorknobs, latches, hinges, hooks and chest lifts are all rare unless you manage to get lucky and find a dealer with a similar piece that is irreparable. Despite the availability status of the parts you need, there are still some essential nuggets of knowledge you should know before attempting antique furniture hardware product restoration.

1. Always search for the materials you need for antique furniture hardware product restoration from home. Availability may mean that trawling the various shops is a complete waste of time. Try calling local antique dealers and stores and then contact those further away if need be. You could also try searching on the Internet. Always narrow your search to those that specialise in the era of your particular piece first as they will often yield more success.

2. Be prepared to travel to pick up the materials you need for antique furniture hardware product restoration. You may want to have the parts mailed to you if they are found in another country, but always be prepared to do anything to protect your investment.

3. Ask a professional for advice. Antique furniture hardware product restoration is a complex process and it only takes one small mistake to permanently ruin your piece so make sure that you seek advice and maybe the services of a professional. Several experts would be prepared to give you quotes so check up on them before selecting a man for the job if you do not want to attempt it yourself.

4. Be prepared to pay out. Antique furniture hardware product restoration is an expensive business. It is usually worth every penny to save your investment but you should be prepared for a hefty bill.